World Heart Day – 2012

Respected All,

Noncommunicable diseases (NCD) are the top cause of death worldwide, killing more than 36 million people in 2008, according to a new report released by the World Health Organization. Cardiovascular diseases were responsible for 48 percent of these deaths, cancers 21 percent, chronic respiratory diseases 12 percent, and diabetes 3 percent.

“This report indicates where each government needs to focus to prevent and treat the four major killers: cancer, heart disease and stroke, lung disease, and diabetes,” said Ala Alwan, M.D., assistant director-general for Noncommunicable Diseases and Mental Health at the World Health Organization.

The report, which provides data gathered from 193 countries, includes information on prevalence, trends in metabolic risk factors (cholesterol, blood pressure, body mass index, and blood sugar) alongside data on the country’s capacity to tackle the diseases.

In 2008, more than nine million of all deaths attributed to NCDs occurred before the age of 60; 90 percent of these “premature” deaths occurred in low- and middle-income countries. One of the findings shows that men and women in low-income countries are around three times more likely to die of NCDs before the age of 60 than in high-income countries.

They also indicate trends for four factors that increase people’s risk of developing these diseases: blood pressure, cholesterol, body mass index and blood sugar over the past 30 years.

Overall, the trends indicate that in many high-income countries, action to reduce blood pressure and cholesterol is having an impact, but there is a need to do more on body mass index and managing diabetes.

The profiles show what countries are doing to tackle noncommunicable diseases in terms of institutional capacity, specified funding, and actions to address the four main diseases and their associated risk factors.

The report also highlights what countries need to do to reduce people’s exposure to risk factors and improve services to prevent and treat noncommunicable diseases.

This report provides all countries with a baseline for monitoring epidemiological trends and assessing the progress they are making to address noncommunicable diseases.

To Your Health and Safety,

Faisal Javed Mir & First Aid to Save a Life Pakistan

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About Faisal Javed Mir

Faisal Javed Mir is Occupational Health and Safety Professional, having 10 years of profound experience with multi-national companies. He has knowledge, skills, experience, tools, proven history and confidence to deliver what is required by learners. He is teaching First Aid since 2006 and certified by MEDIC First Aid International of United States for many first aid certification programs.
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